The Standard of Perfection


If you've ever spoken with someone at Precision Plymouth Rocks Inc., or visited our Facebook page you'll know that we constantly reference the American Poultry Association's Standard of Perfection.

The Standard of Perfection is a print resource that PPR Inc. takes very seriously. All of our birds are bred to the Standard. So what is the Standard? "First published in 1874 by the American Poultry Association, the Standard of Perfection (commonly referred to as "the Standard") classifies and describes the standard physical appearance, coloring and temperament for all recognized breeds of poultry, including chickens, ducks, turkeys, and geese. The current edition was published in 2010. The Standard is used by American Poultry Association judges at sanctioned poultry shows to judge poultry, and by those who participate in the competitive showing of selectively bred birds that conform to the standard, which led to the term "standard bred" poultry. The first edition of the book listed 41 breeds, and today's versions have nearly 60. There are 19 classes of poultry recognized by the American Poultry Association. Eleven of these classes are devoted to chickens, of which six are classes of large breeds and five are bantam classes. There are four classes of ducks and three classes of geese, both divided by weight. All breeds of turkeys are grouped into one class." Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Standard_of_Perfection

In other words, The Standard lists all the breds that are recognized by the American Poultry Association and describes what they would look and act like once they have achieved perfection. By breeding to the Standard we are working towards perfection and producing high performing, show quality chickens.

Stay tuned for future posts on the Standard, how to apply it to specific chickens and why it is important to do so.


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